This toppled lifeguard tower is where I finished my roll of Pan F and started a new roll of Portra 160. It was a good choice for the subdued colours of the late afternoon, and I like breaking up the relentless greys of my 'film' keyword.

I might print this for the critique group, but for that I'll clone out the little dark cloud that's just poking in on the right side of the frame.

The three people who might read this will already know that I'm a sucker for this kind of long exposure over water with a static composition. But if you want to click on the less-blue of this pair you'll see that I've managed to make Portra 160 look grainy. That shouldn't be possible, but it's a talent that I have. Next I'll try that with Ektar; Pro Image 100 would be too easy.

In a way Portra and Pan F are similar: getting decent results out of both are a bit of a chore. Not that Portra isn't a good and flexible film, etc, but colour balancing the scans is tough. These are frames 34, 36. and 31, so it's not as if the light has changed much,but I'm mucking around with different exposures with the ND filters. The one with the power plant is using the ten-stop and thirty seconds; the other two are six-stop ND and only four or five seconds long.

On the other hand, my scanner automatically removes scratches and dust for C41 film, so that's a definite advantage.

These photos were taken on the lake near the Rouge Hill GO station, which has train service every half hour in each direction. Me being clever, after about an hour of listening to them roar though I realized that I could plan for when the trains would be photographable.

This is another five-second exposure, probably using the six-stop ND and three-stop ND grad to bring the sky down and tame the sun that's showing through the thin clouds. I've had to bring up the shadows and tone down the reds in the dormant vegetation, but I like the moodiness. For me it looks like it felt to have these machines passing at speed on a late-winter day.

No, trains aren't a big break from my usual subjects, at least I didn't only photograph slow water for the entire time that I was out.