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There are straws, there are camels, and there are backs.

I've discovered that my ability to deal with things doesn't taper off gradually any more – or perhaps it never did, but I never had reason to know that before. So anyway, last weekend I needed to go for a walk, and the direction didn't much matter. So I picked up my pinholing kit and headed out for a bit.

Luke would always tell me to think positively: it's a garbage can, not a garbage can't.

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I wound up heading down toward Ontario Place and the lake, which fundamentally involves getting there the long way. 

My pinhole kit is two cameras, the smaller plastic Reality So Subtle 6x9 that had a 2-stop ND filter on it, and the wooden Ondu 6x12 Rise. Equally important are three different supports: a Smallrig super clamp with a short flex arm for attaching to small things, a Delkin Fat Gecko vise clamp for signposts and railings, and my little Gitzo Mini Traveller tabletop tripod.

These first two photos are from the RSS camera, with FP4 in Microphen. I used two rolls of FP4, one Ortho, and, help me, a profoundly expired roll of Ektar.

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RSS photo on top, Ondo photo on the bottom.

I used to live here – on weekends, at least. It was over thirty years ago, long before 'Liberty Village' took its name from a nearby street. Back then this was a disused warehouse space, mostly holding stacks of second-hand office furniture and remaindered Scientology paperbacks, but some artists had also established work/studio spaces there. (It was definitely not meant as residential.) The wooden stairs creaked like a monster, the steam pipes banged and groaned, and everything else rattled or slammed. It was weird, scary, and awesome.

The top photo had the RSS camera clamped to the cigarette butt holder that was attached to the side of the deluxe coffee something that used to be a condemned steam plant. (I think? I used to play in there, but wasn't quite sure what the equipment was.) The lower photo was taken with the upper rise pinhole when the Ondu was clamped to the top of a Reserved Parking sign for one of the tech businesses inside. The company that made my e-reader also has an office in this building now.

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Ondu photo on top, again using the rise pinhole but this time on the little tripod. The RSS photo had the camera clamped to the top of the trailer's channel bumper. Each of these exposures were a couple of minutes long.

Part of the charm of how I use the pinholes comes from using impromptu supports and being forced to find different angles. Yes, I could use a normal tripod like a normal person – I own enough of them – except that I can't. Not comfortably, anyway. With the current situation a large tripod marks me as doing something other than an essential trip out of my home. So it's small cameras and small supports that easily fit in a small, nondescript bag and let me move on promptly.

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Benches and garbage can.

When I took this photo it wouldn't have been illegal for me to sit at that picnic table – so much can change in a week. This photo is on Ektar, help me, but the colour scan results were so bad that I remembered why I stick with black and white film. And there's so much dust on it that the decision of whether to clone it out or to redo the scan just makes me sad and want to give up on it altogether.

Straws, camels, backs.

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Finally at Ontario Place. This is the Ondu again, finally using the centre pinhole. (I probably could have used the lower one, but I thought the sky would be more interesting than it was.) 

The camera is clamped to the railing with a little ball head and the Fat Gecko vise, which I bought for its name and its ability to firmly suspend the camera out in space from larger objects. The fine pitch of its thread makes it very strong but slow to adjust. It's certainly capable of holding on to anything that my smaller clamp can grab, but the time and tedium involved in moving from the 2-3"" clamping width down to the 0-.5" range means I'm likely to decide that the scene isn't that photogenic after all and wander off. 

(I think my point was going to be that if I was carrying a floor-standing tripod I wouldn't have been able to take this photo.)

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And the lake.

Despite the aspect ratio this was taken with the RSS 6x9, which is made of plastic and had a filter on the front to protect its pinhole. That makes it a much better camera to be perching on rocks and get splashed with waves. By this point I'd finished the eight frames on its roll of FP4, and switched to Ortho for a number of different versions of this photo.

It was a nice spot, and I always feel better when I can see the horizon over water.