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After extended consideration my 2022 Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day kit looked a lot like what I used for 2021, which makes sense since I was going back to the same place and carried the same camera bag. The Ondu 6x12 Rise and RSS 6x9F were joined by a newer companion, the Scura 35mm, and I carried two fewer clamps and a better midsized tripod. This kept my weight about the same, but didn't limit my options.

Since I wrote about the cameras last year, this year I thought I'd focus on the smaller bits and pieces that don't usually merit a mention.

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I like this tripod plate so much that I own three of them. It's the Haoge PQR-70 with the anti-rotation lip, which makes it look a little out of place on the curved Scura, but it makes more sense on a rectangular camera. I like that it's big enough to be a stable base when the camera is just set down on a surface. But the best thing about it is that it has its own tripod socket, so there's no need to remove it when I switch to my mini tripod or a thing-clamp that doesn't use a quick release camera-clamp. I do have a spare dogbone arca-style clamp that I can put on my Gitzo Mini tripod, but that spoils the smallness that makes it so easy to carry and use.

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This is the Gerber Armbar Drive knife. Gerber's strength is making things that appeal to zombie apocalypse survivalists – things that look fancy, don't cost much, and will never be used – but this tool is surprisingly decent. The most important part is the driver that can hold any standard hex bit, which I've equipped with the hex wrench that tightens up tripod plates. There's also a broad slot screwdriver at the butt of the knife for screws that would normally be tightened with a coin. The locking blade, once it's sharp, is good for getting into 120 film packets and taking off the paper wrap without damaging the film. And the whole thing is boxy and heavy enough that it stays in whatever pocket it's put in. I'd never carry it for anything else, but it's handy for photo outings.

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I bought this pouch as a signal blocker for my phone, which might still be useful someday. Until then its 7.5x3.5" nominal size can hold a half-dozen rolls of 120 film, and squeeze in a seventh if it really needs to. It's a good way to stay organized, and the fold-over lip of the metallic inner pocket should make it reasonably light-proof in case a spent roll isn't wound tightly enough. It's also very helpful that it has a smaller front pocket that can hold the foil wrappers and paper bands that are otherwise too easy to turn into littler.

Changing a roll of medium format film usually needs three or four hands, so anything that makes storing and changing film more convenient is a win. And pouches are easier to carry than a rigid box.

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My RSS camera on my RRS ballhead, attached to an older Gitzo GT1931 Basalt that's been under more of my cameras on the Spit than any other.

I like tape. This is good news for my leaky Chroma Cube, which is practically made out of it by now, but not much escapes it for long. Especially reflective tape, which is a particular fetish of mine owing to a legacy of night photography and a lifetime of dealing with Toronto drivers.

The Reality So Subtle camera has it on the back to make it easier to spot and to cover up some scuffs, the result of an ill-fated attempt to attach a second bubble level. The Really Right Stuff ballhead has it to cover up its brand name, the result of the company's owner attempting to remove basic rights from a large group of people. But there's also black reflective tape wrapped around the legs of my basalt tripod and on the front of each of the quick-release plates, and silver reflective tape on the fold-over flap of my film pouch. I'm a big believer in making things easier to see, especially when they're dropped at night.

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But the most significant Other Item that I carry is the one that isn't in these photos – it's the thing taking them. My phone is my spare camera, light meter, bubble level, exposure timer, map, trip planner, and safety connection as I wander around a landscape that's full of exciting and unexpected ways to break an ankle or be impaled. Fortunately I've never needed that last feature.

But most importantly it's also a viewfinder. When I'm in a rebar mood, as I was this past WPPD, I'm often trying to get the camera into places where I can't fit my head. (See 'impaled', above.) Instead I'll set up the clamp in a promising position, and then use my phone-camera to take a test photo. If I'm really clever, then I'll also remember that I can use my watch as a remote control and viewfinder. This doesn't guarantee a good photo, but it does prevent some terrible ones.

And isn't that what a good photo accessory is all about?